Category Archives for "Craft"

Nevermore: The Power of Words

By Kathrese McKee | Craft

Words have power. So much power. Words hurt, heal, bolster the ego, or kill the spirit. Be careful, my dear ones, to use them for good and nevermore for evil. Fair warning. Today, I will share a few words about my faith; however, I do so in the hopes that you will examine your own […]

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Slaying the Dread Synopsis

By Kathrese McKee | Craft

If you have ever written a master’s thesis, a doctoral dissertation, or even a super-long academic paper, chances are that you have written an abstract. Abstracts are expected for scientific studies, too, and put simply, an abstract is a courtesy to the reader to help them decide if the full-length work is what they are […]

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Finding Your Mirror Moment

By Kathrese McKee | Craft

 Have you ever made it through a movie only to ask yourself, “What’s the point?” My daughters, who are horror fans, watched The Open House this week, and they hated it. Can you guess why? I’ll save you the trouble. The storytelling was weak. The writers failed at story structure, and the fans were not […]

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Don’t Call It an Outline

By Kathrese McKee | Craft

Back when I first played around with the idea of writing a book, I opened up a spiral and started writing a story I thought my kids would enjoy. Every spare moment—at games and doctor visits and during lunch—I would invent problems for my characters to solve and things for them to say. Eventually, a […]

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Eight Ways to Characterize

By Kathrese McKee | Craft

Back when I wrote my first book, I was disconcerted when my critique partner simply could not like my main character (MC). Actually, I had two main characters—a young man and a young woman—but my partner loved the guy and hated the girl. Good grief! These two characters were supposed to fall in love. What […]

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Twelve Ways to Generate Story Ideas

By Kathrese McKee | Craft

Generating and Capturing Story Ideas I hope that you have a notebook of ideas in your backpack or desk drawer so that any time you feel as though you are “running dry,” you can restart your writing process. How often have you heard your author friends complain about writer’s block? They make it sound as […]

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